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What Can I Do If My Manager Is Sexually Harassing Me? I Need The Top Sex Harassment Lawyer In Ohio To Sue My Employer!

| Apr 29, 2016 | Sexual Harassment |

Best Ohio Sexual Harassment Attorney Answer: What conduct constitutes unlawful sexual harassment? Should I sue my company for my boss sexually harassing me? Can I do anything if customers at my job are sexually harassing me?

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Sexual harassment in the workplace is a sub-species of gender discrimination that violates both Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Ohio Revised Code 4112, and is a topic frequently covered on this blog. (See Can I Sue My Employer For Sexual Harassment?; Can I Sue My Same Gender Boss For Sexual Harassment?; What Should I Do If I Was Fired For Reporting Sexual Harassment?; and Can I Sue My Job For Sexual Harassment By Customers Or Coworkers?).

Unlawful sexual harassment may be either in the form of quid pro quo harassment or hostile work environment. Quid pro quo sexual harassment occurs when (1) an employee is subjected to unwelcome sexual harassment, be that in the form of sexual advances or requests for sexual favors; (2) the harassment is unwelcome; (3) submission to the harassment is a condition for receiving job benefits, or refusal to submit would result in termination or denial of job benefits; (4) the harasser was a supervisor or agent of the employer; (5) the employee was harmed; and (6) the harassment caused the employee’s harm. A boss who tells an underling that he or she will be fired unless the employee gives him a kiss, gives him a blow or has sex with him, and who then fires that employee when she recoils in disgust and refuses to engage in the sexual demands is of quid pro quo sexual harassment.

Hostile work environment, based on sexual harassment, is a bit different. To establish a claim for hostile work environment, the victim employee has to show that (1) he or she was subjected to unwanted harassment; (2) the harassment was based on sex; and (3) the harassment was so severe or pervasive that it altered the conditions of employment. For example, a supervisor that comes in every day and shows pictures of pornography and recounts his or her sexual encounters in vivid detail would be making his or her subordinate employees work in a sexually hostile environment.

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An Ohio employee who is the victim of either form of workplace harassment may bring a claim under either state or federal law. However, as a regular reader of our employment discrimination blog knows, an employee may only bring a federal claim for sexual harassment after first filing a charge with, and receiving a Right to Sue letter from, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC“) (Should I File With The EEOC Or Should I Get My Own Lawyer?, Can The EEOC Stop My Boss From Discriminating Against Me?, Do I Need A Lawyer To Help Me File An EEOC Charge?).

A documentary currently available on Amazon and an upcoming HBO movie have put one of the most bizarre and sensational examples of alleged sexual harassment back in the public eye. The documentary Anita: Speaking Truth to Power and the upcoming film Confirmation take a look back at the confirmation hearings of Justice Clarence Thomas, focusing on the testimony of Anita Hill.

In 1991, Thomas was nominated by President George H.W. Bush to fill the United States Supreme Court seat of retiring Justice Thurgood Marshall. Hill had worked for Thomas at both the Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights and at the EEOC. As part of Thomas’s background check, the FBI interviewed Hill, then a professor at the University of Oklahoma College of Law. During her FBI interview, and subsequent Congressional testimony, Hill alleged that while working for Thomas, Thomas repeatedly asked her out on dates, spoke about “such matters as women having sex with animals and films showing group sex or rape scenes,” discussed his sexual prowess, and made lewd, now infamous, remarks about pubic hairs and cans of Coca Cola. Thomas, of course, vehemently denied the allegations, survived the controversy, and has sat on the nation’s highest court for the past twenty-five years. Hill, after taking a polygraph test, which verified her veracity, returned to teaching.

Two and a half decades later, only Hill, now a tenured professor at Brandeis, and Thomas know what really happened. What is knowable is that one of two well-respected, Ivy League educated lawyers, each of whom previously worked for the EEOC, lied.

It is because to the twists and turns that these sort of cases bring that makes it important to get a qualified sex harassment lawyer. Few sexual harassment claims garner the sort of attention that the Thomas confirmation hearings did. Sexual harassment, though, is still widespread in the workplace.

Sexual harassment is unlawful under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and similar Ohio laws. Sexual harassment is a form of gender discrimination. If you feel that you are being sexually harassed or are working in a sexually charged or hostile working environment, you should not wait to call the right attorney at 866-797-6040 to schedule a free and confidential consultation. At The Spitz Law Firm, you will meet with a sexual harassment lawyer/hostile work environment attorney to find out what your legal rights are and the best way to protect them. Sexual harrassment is a form of gender discrimination, and employers should be held accountable if they discriminate against female workers in any fashion – but particularly for sexual harrassment. It does not matter if you have been wrongfully fired or are still employed, there is no reason to wait to find out what your legal rights are and how to protect yourself from sexual harassment and gender discrimination.

Disclaimer:

The materials available at the top of this page and at this gender discrimination, wrongful termination, and sex harassment law website are for informational purposes only and not for the purpose of providing legal advice. If you are still asking “what should I do …”, “I’m being sexually harassed …” “my supervisor grabbed my…”, “my boss is touching…,” “I’ve been wrongfully terminated,” or “how do I …”, your best course is to contact an Ohio sexual harassment attorney/hostile work environment lawyer to obtain advice with respect to sexual harassment/hostile work environment questions or any particular employment law issue. Use and access to this employment law website or any of the links contained within the site do not create an attorney-client relationship. The legal opinions expressed at the top of this page or through this employment law website are the opinions of the individual lawyer and may not reflect the opinions of The Spitz Law Firm, Brian Spitz, or any individual attorney.