Covid-19: We are still open and our employment attorneys are available for you. If you have been forced to work against the government orders or wrongfully fired, call us now. For more information on Coronavirus related employment laws, click here.

The Spitz Law Firm, LLC

Call The Right Attorney

No Fee Guarantee

Can My Employer Require A Second Opinion Before Giving Me FMLA? I Need A Lawyer!

| Jun 11, 2015 | family medical leave claims |

Best Ohio FMLA Attorney Answer: Can my employer make me see their doctor before granting my FMLA request? Can my employer require that my sick family member be seen by their doctor? What happens if my doctor and my employer’s doctor disagree?

FMLA, Family Medical Leave Act, doctor, second opinion, challenges, Employment, Lawyer, Law Firm, attorney, Ohio, Cleveland, employer, employee, best, top, Brian Spitz, how do I, what should I do, my boss, my employer, medical leave, retaliated, my, jobUnder the Family Medical Leave Act (“FMLA”) eligible employees can take up to twelve weeks off from work to handle their own serious medical needs, or for those of a family member. However, many employers are becoming more aggressive about preventing FMLA abuse by requiring employees to get a second opinion from a doctor of the employer’s choosing. Can they do that?

29 C.F.R § 825.307(b) specifically allows employers to require employees to get a second opinion from a doctor of the employer’s choosing when the employer has a reason to doubt the validity of a medical certification provided with a FMLA request – whether it is for the employees own health condition, or for the health condition of a family member. However, the employer is not allowed to request a second opinion when FML leave is requested to be with a newborn baby or upon adoption of a child.

I’m sure that you are wondering, but the doctor giving the second opinion cannot be someone the employer goes to on a regular basis. Thus, the employer cannot hire the same doctor over and over again, eliminating the risk that the doctor might have an incentive to give the employer the opinion it wants. Moreover, the employer must reimburse the employee or their family member for any travel expenses to the second doctor, and cannot require the employee or family member to travel outside normal commuting distance for the purposes of the second opinion.

What type of lawyer do I need to sue my employer for FMLA violations? To Learn about your FMLA rights and possible medical leave claim rights, call attorney Brian Spitz and the employment law lawyers at The Spitz Law Firm to get your very own free initial consultation.

As you might guess, sometimes the employee’s doctor and the employer’s doctor disagree. What happens then? 29 C.F.R § 825.307(c) provides for a “tie-breaker” opinion, or for the opinion of a third doctor. However, the employer and employee must jointly agree on a doctor to provide the third opinion. If the employer acts in bad faith in selecting a third doctor, it will be bound by the opinion of the employee’s first doctor. The opinion of the third doctor is final and binding. Employers must produce copies of the second doctor and third doctor’s opinions upon the employee’s request. The employer is also responsible for reimbursing the employee or their family member for travel cost associated with seeing the third doctor.

So, this process will likely take some time. What happens while this back and forth is going on? While waiting for the second or even third medical evaluation, the FMLA provides that the employee provisionally gets to be on protected leave.

If you feel that you are being denied leave rights under the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) or are being retaliated against for taking medical leave, you should call the right attorney as quickly as possible to schedule a free and confidential consultation. The phone number to contact an Ohio attorney for FMLA help is (216) 291-4744. While you focus on your family medical needs, let our FLMA attorneys focus on your medical leave rights.

Disclaimer:

This employment law website is an advertisement. The materials available at the top of this medical leave page and on this employment law website are for informational purposes only and not for the purpose of providing legal advice. If you are still asking, “how do I get medical leave under the FMLA?”, “what should I do when my job won’t give me medical leave?”, “can my boss deny me medical leave?”, “what should I do if I was fired in retaliation for taking FMLA leave?”, or “is my employer allowed to…?”, your best option is to contact an Ohio medical leave attorney to obtain advice with respect to FMLA questions or any particular employment law issue. Use and access to this employment law website or any of the links contained within the site do not create an attorney-client relationship. The legal opinions expressed at or through this site are the opinions of the individual lawyer and may not reflect the opinions of The Spitz Law Firm, LLC, Brian Spitz, or any individual attorney.